Shhh… Microsoft's Wi-Fi Sense Can Make You the 'Hotspot'

Check out The Daily Dot article below:


Windows 10 can share your Wi-Fi password with your Facebook friends

By Mike Wehner
Jul 3, 2015, 12:28pm CT

If you’ve been using the internet for any considerable amount of time you already know that your password is really never absolutely secure. From hacking incidents to other security breaches, it’s impossible to know that your secret code is indeed always secret, and now Microsoft’s soon to be released Windows 10 is making one of your passwords even less secure by gifting it to your Facebook friends.

Microsoft’s Wi-Fi Sense feature—already in operation on Windows Phones and coming to Windows 10 upon its debut later this year—is aimed at making it easier to share your connection with your friends. To that end, it allows users to effortlessly use each other’s Wi-Fi connections by allowing them to use your password.

The password itself is encrypted and shared automatically once you opt-in, and the list of people who can use it includes your Outlook mail contacts, Skype contacts, and even your Facebook friends.

The idea here is that if you’re at a friends house and you both have Wi-Fi Sense, you can join their network without having to ask for their password. Ideally, such a system will save you from using your wireless data plan as much as possible, thereby saving you a few bucks.

However, there are likely plenty of people on your Facebook or email contact lists that you wouldn’t want browsing from your own internet connection, and that’s where the potential for trouble comes in. Not surprisingly, Microsoft’s own FAQ about Wi-Fi Sense is filled with warnings about connecting to unfamiliar hotspots, as well as sharing your connection with those you don’t trust.

The documentation also notes that you cannot pick and choose individual contacts with which to share your connection. Instead, you’ll only be able to toggle huge groups on or off, like everyone from your Skype list or your entire Facebook friends roster. So, if you don’t trust absolutely everyone you know on Facebook, Skype, or Outlook, it’s probably a good idea to leave this would-be handy little feature unused.

Shhh… The Internet of Things – Google's New Patent for a Creepy Wi-fi Connected Toy

Google snooping on your web browsing or email may now be the least of your worries.

Late last week, it became known that Google has filed its creepiest patents yet – for a toy that can control other Wi-fi connected devices. Well for starters, just imagine this: If that toy senses you’re looking at it, it will rotate its head and look back at you…

Shhh… Doll Hack? New Wi-fi Connected "Hello Barbie" Risks Inviting Pedophiles Into the Barbie World

Barbie-HelloBarbie3

The newly announced internet-connected “Hello Barbie” (see video clip below) may be every girls’ dream but every parents’ nightmare.

The first-ever conversational doll (developed by ToyTalk in partnership with Mattel) will chat with the kids, record their conversations and transmit the recorded data to servers to be analyzed… and yes, risk being hacked and abused by pedophiles.

Think about it, it has all the hacking ingredients for any tech savvy blokes: wi-fi connection, speech-recognition software, phone apps (for kids?!), two-way conversations with kids and cloud storage.

Not convinced? Consider this: these capabilities mean these Barbies can also eavesdrop and record any conversation within the four-walls. Not much difference from the internet-connected spying Samsung smart TV.

“It wouldn’t take much for a malicious individual to intercept either the wi-fi communications from the phone or tablet, or connect to the doll over Bluetooth directly. These problems aren’t difficult to solve; the manufacturer needs to check the phone application carefully to make sure it’s secure. They also need to check that any information sent by the doll to their online systems is protected,” reportedly according to Ken Munro, a security researcher at Pen Test Partners, who has previously warned about the vulnerabilities in another doll called Cayla which uses speech-recognition and Google’s translation tools.

Coping With Offline Snoops

Latest NSA Revelations Not the End of the World

The latest NSA revelations about their ability to penetrate into computers that are not even connected to the Internet may have caused deep concerns but there are at least 2 defensive measures one can undertake.

You can find out more from my latest column here.

The Walls that Spy

Bad news for those who say ‘If only the walls could talk’. They can.

Hotel rooms are never safe havens as spies know only too well, but warnings of the risk often fall on deaf ears, to the sorrow or sometimes embarrassment of the tenants. Two recent news stories and the episode that I describe below hopefully change the public perceptions.

The stories describe how the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has traced and wiretapped top diplomats in their hotel suites over the past three years through its secret “Royal Concierge” program, which tracked some 350 hotels across the world, according to documents exposed by the former US intelligence contractor turned fugitive Edward Snowden.

Separately, it emerged in media reports last week that US President Barack Obama takes extreme measures to ward off any threats of secret video or audio surveillance by setting up an anti-spy portable tent in his hotel suite when traveling abroad, including in allied countries that the US allegedly targeted in conducting massive surveillance against foreign leaders and citizens. That amplifies the deep US concerns about being spied upon as much as spying on its friends and risks inviting potential hypocritical labeling of the White House.

I have written previously about the risk but there is much more than meets the eye, including an interesting exchange I once had with a foreign agent about the spy trade and hotel room risks.

Please find the entire column here and there.