Shhh… French Asylum Offer to Snowden & Assange as Ultimate US Contempt

(Above) Photo credit: The Intercept

No surprise, that’s the ultimate official French reaction to the WikiLeaks’ Espionnage Élysée exposé on the NSA “unspeakable practice” earlier this week – check out The Intercept article below.

French Justice Minister Says Snowden and Assange Could Be Offered Asylum

By Jenna McLaughlin @JennaMC_Laugh

French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira thinks National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange might be allowed to settle in France.

If France decides to offer them asylum, she would “absolutely not be surprised,” she told French news channel BFMTV on Thursday (translated from the French). She said it would be a “symbolic gesture.”

Taubira was asked about the NSA’s sweeping surveillance of three French presidents, disclosed by WikiLeaks this week, and called it an “unspeakable practice.”

Her comments echoed those in an editorial in France’s leftist newspaper Libération Thursday morning, which said giving Snowden asylum would be a “single gesture” that would send “a clear and useful message to Washington,” in response to the “contempt” the U.S. showed by spying on France’s president.

Snowden, who faces criminal espionage charges in the U.S., has found himself stranded in Moscow with temporary asylum as he awaits responses from two dozen countries where he’d like to live; and Assange is trapped inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to avoid extradition to Sweden. (See correction below.)

Taubira, the chief of France’s Ministry of Justice, holds the equivalent position of the attorney general in the United States. She has been described in the press as a “maverick,” targeting issues such as poverty and same-sex marriage, often inspiring anger among French right-wingers.

Taubira doesn’t actually have the power to offer asylum herself, however. She said in the interview that such a decision would be up to the French president, prime minister and foreign minister. And Taubira just last week threatened to quit her job unless French President François Hollande implemented her juvenile justice reforms.

Correction: Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this article improperly described the state of Assange’s case in Sweden and his reason for avoiding extradition. He has refused to go to Sweden, where he faces accusations of sexual assault, because he fears he could then be extradited to the United States.

(This post is from our blog: Unofficial Sources.)

Shhh… US Federal Court: Warrantless Surveillance Footage in Public Areas is an Invasion of Privacy

Guess one would easily assume privacy does not apply in public areas – just look at the proliferation of CCTV cameras in the streets.

Well, that’s probably not necessarily the case judging by one recent court ruling in Washington. It may be good news for the general public and bad news for law enforcement.

Now first, many would probably associate the following 2 photos with typical covert surveillance operations, whereby operatives waited patiently to snap photos (and video) evidence of their subjects.

Surveillance-Detectives

Surveillance-Detectives2

But in this case involving the Washington police and Leonel Vargas (an “undocumented” immigrant suspected of drug trafficking), the authorities had a better idea.

The police planted a video camera, without a warrant, on a nearby utility pole 100 yards from Vargas’ rural Washington state house and shot 6 weeks worth of footage of his front yard whereby they eventually captured convincing evidence.

Vargas challenged the case on the grounds of violation of his privacy, which the government argued was not valid as his front yard is a public space and thus privacy does not apply.

The evidence put forward by the authorities was subsequently thrown out of the court by US District Judge Edward Shea, whose ruling is well summed up as such:

Law enforcement’s warrantless and constant covert video surveillance of Defendant’s rural front yard is contrary to the public’s reasonable expectation of privacy and violates Defendant’s Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search. The video evidence and fruit of the video evidence are suppressed.

Find out more about this case from here and there.

Shhh… CIA's Declassified Archives – Highlight American Vulnerabilities

The US Central Intelligence Agency released on Thursday a trove of newly declassified “Studies in Intelligence” documents on its homepage.

The move was the result of a long-running lawsuit between the agency and a former employee Jeffrey Scudder – according to the Washington Post (see video clip below) – whose CIA stint includes a 2-year spell looking after the agency’s historical files which ultimately ended his CIA career after he submitted a request under the Freedom of Information Act to release records of old clandestine operations he believed should have been made public.

Amongst the 249 documents released, spanning from the 1970s to 2000s, there’s one labeled “Analyzing Economic Espionage” which attempts to examine foreign intelligence operations against US economic interests beyond the scope and threats of technological advances – including the focus on certain traits of Americans that make them vulnerable to foreign agents, ie. resulting in a threat to the US.

“Foreign intelligence services are more inclined to operate against American targets outside the US” and “some intelligence services that stop short of recruiting US citizens use intelligence operatives to elicit information from them; the targeted American is unwitting of his interlocutor’s intelligence connection”.

CIAclassified

The 7-page document listed “certain personality attributes that increase our vulnerability”:

– Americans like to talk. We tend to be sociable and gregarious, even with casual contacts. We want to be liked, especially by foreigners, because many of us are still trying to overcome an “ugly American” complex. We place a higher premium on candor than on guile, on trust than on discretion.

– Many Americans do not know foreign languages, which in some respects puts them at a disadvantage when living in foreign countries. This does not mean we are “innocents abroad,” but it may make us less likely to pick up clues of suspicious behavior. Americans who do not know the language of a given country may forget that nationals of that country in a position to overhear their conversations often do know English.

– Many Americans are ambitious, oriented toward job advancement and professional recognition. Inevitably, some morally weak individuals are willing to sacrifice personal integrity in pursuit of their career goals.