Shhh… The Chinese Version of All the President's Men

(Above) Photo credit: Max Whittaker for The New York Times.

Below is a New York Times article on a China matter widely quoted by the Chinese media.

And here are some additional background coverage on the case:

China Seeks Businessman Said to Have Fled to U.S., Further Straining Ties
By MICHAEL FORSYTHE and MARK MAZZETTIAUG. 3, 2015

LOOMIS, Calif. — China is demanding that the Obama administration return a wealthy and politically connected businessman who fled to the United States, according to several American officials familiar with the case. Should he seek political asylum, he could become one of the most damaging defectors in the history of the People’s Republic.

The case of the businessman, Ling Wancheng, has strained relations between two nations already at odds over numerous issues before President Xi Jinping’s first state visit to the United States in September, including an extensive cybertheft of American government data and China’s aggressive territorial claims.

Mr. Ling is the youngest brother of Ling Jihua, who for years held a post equivalent to that of the White House chief of staff, overseeing the Communist Party’s inner sanctum as director of its General Office. Ling Jihua is one of the highest-profile casualties of an anticorruption campaign that Mr. Xi has made a centerpiece of his government.

The Obama administration has thus far refused to accede to Beijing’s demands for Ling Wancheng, and his possible defection could be an intelligence coup at China’s expense after it was revealed last month that computer hackers had stolen the personnel files of millions of American government workers and contractors. American officials have said that they are nearly certain the Chinese government carried out the data theft.

Mr. Ling’s wealth and his family’s status have allowed him to move freely in elite circles in China, and he may be in possession of embarrassing information about current and former officials loyal to Mr. Xi.

Mr. Ling appears to have evaded the Chinese authorities. He is now in the United States, according to several American officials and his next-door neighbor here in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, where property records show Mr. Ling owns a 7,800-square-foot home, which he bought from a professional basketball player for $2.5 million.

The Chinese government in recent months has been raising pressure on the Obama administration to return Mr. Ling, according to the American officials. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to discuss a delicate diplomatic matter that has already complicated an arrangement made in April between the Department of Homeland Security and China’s Ministry of Public Security.

Under that arrangement, signed during a visit to Beijing by Jeh Johnson, the secretary of Homeland Security, the United States would be able to repatriate many of the tens of thousands of Chinese currently in the United States awaiting deportation, some in American detention facilities. In return, the United States would help the Chinese track down wealthy fugitives from China living in the United States who might also be breaking American laws.

Several American officials confirmed that Mr. Ling is in the United States, but they would not say publicly whether Mr. Ling had applied for asylum or give information about his whereabouts. The Department of Homeland Security, which handles asylum cases, does not comment about specific cases because of privacy laws.

China’s Foreign Ministry did not comment after being sent a faxed request for information on Mr. Ling’s case. Press officers for the White House, State Department and Department of Homeland Security declined to comment.

Three telephone numbers that people in California used to contact Mr. Ling all had Dallas area codes. Mr. Ling, whose English is said to be poor, did not respond to text messages in Chinese requesting an interview. Two of the three numbers are no longer in service, and no one answered the third number.

Christopher K. Johnson, a former C.I.A. analyst focusing on China, said the Chinese leadership might want Mr. Ling’s assistance in prosecuting his older brother. And, Mr. Johnson said, it would want to prevent the “treasure trove” of knowledge he has about Chinese politics from passing to United States officials.

“The leadership would want this guy badly,” Mr. Johnson, now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said in a telephone interview. “There’s no question that he would have access to a lot of interesting things.”

While it is unclear how much Ling Wancheng knows, the Communist Party itself has revealed some tantalizing clues about his brother Ling Jihua’s behavior, claiming that his corruption was a family affair. Last month, the party announced that Ling Jihua — a loyalist to the previous president, Hu Jintao — had been expelled from the party and would be tried, saying that he had “accepted huge bribes personally and through his family.”

Ling Jihua, 58, rose through the Communist Party’s Youth League under Mr. Hu in the 1980s and eventually served as either deputy or chief of the Central Committee’s General Office from 1999 to 2012. He was Mr. Hu’s personal secretary and closest protégé, and his position came with great powers: the ability to control the guards who protected the senior leadership, a significant voice in top personnel appointments and a central role in carrying out policy.

“It’s really the nerve center for the entire system,” Joseph Fewsmith, a professor at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University who focuses on Chinese politics, said of Ling Jihua’s former position. “This is the essence of power politics.”

Ling Jihua was expected to advance to the elite Politburo, as every person who previously held that position since 1942 had done, including former Prime Minister Wen Jiabao.

But on March 18, 2012, Ling Jihua’s son was killed when the black Ferrari he was driving crashed in Beijing. One of two women with him in the car later died.

Ling Jihua’s botched cover-up of the episode helped lead to his political downfall. He was denied a spot on the Politburo, demoted to a less important post and, in December 2014, officially put under a corruption investigation.

But the corruption inquiry into Ling Jihua goes far beyond the Ferrari crash, and his younger brother, Ling Wancheng, may have played an important role.

As a senior official, Ling Jihua had his moves monitored. But his brother, as a private citizen, was far less constrained. He built a fortune as the chief of a Beijing-based investment company, which bought well-timed stakes in companies that went on to hold successful initial public offerings, earning the firm $225 million, according to a report in Caixin, a respected Chinese news media company. A company using the same California address that he used to buy his home in Loomis also bought at least two golf courses, one near Loomis, the other in Carson City, Nev., property records show.

Ling Wancheng is one of several Chinese citizens in the United States whom Beijing has requested be returned to China. A forum has been established to discuss these cases, called the U.S.-China Joint Liaison Group on Law Enforcement Cooperation, where the Chinese regularly press their case to Obama administration officials.

However, Ling Wancheng, who is believed to be in his mid-50s and goes by the name Wang Cheng or Jason Wang, was not on the publicly disclosed list of 40 fugitives believed to be in the United States that was released by the Chinese government this year, indicating how delicate the case may be to the senior leadership.

Marc Raimondi, a spokesman for the Department of Justice, said the department “has repeatedly shown that it will vigorously pursue prosecutions in the United States where there is alleged money laundering or other criminal activity in this country by fugitives sought by China.”

But, he added, “it is not sufficient to simply provide a list of names.” The department has urged China to provide evidence, Mr. Raimondi said.

In late 2013, Mr. Ling, using the name Wang Cheng, and a person using the name Li Ping, the same name as a former presenter on state television whom the Chinese news media have identified as Mr. Ling’s wife, bought a house in a gated community in Loomis from a National Basketball Association player, Beno Udrih, real estate records show.

Ray Matteson, Mr. Ling’s neighbor in Loomis, and his wife soon became friends with the couple next door, who introduced themselves as Jason and Jane Wang. The Mattesons invited them over for dinner or drinks at least three times. Mr. Ling offered gifts, once giving them a bottle of liquor from the family’s home province, Shanxi, and on another occasion two magnums of California wine.

The Mattesons said their neighbor had given no hints about his family’s high-level political struggle, the arrest of Ling Jihua and another older brother or the death of his nephew.

“In my mind, there’s no question he was a gentleman,” said Mr. Matteson, who, along with another person who met him in Loomis, confirmed that Jason Wang was the man identified in the Chinese news media as Mr. Ling. Neither person, however, could match the woman introduced as Jane Wang with pictures of Li Ping, the former Chinese television presenter.

Mr. Ling would send text messages to his next-door neighbors. His English was poor, so he often used emoji, like a thumbs up or a happy face. He would send links to videos he found funny, and he asked for advice on where to find people to clean his windows.

Mr. Matteson said he had not seen Mr. Ling since October, when the two couples had dinner at Mr. Matteson’s home. But if Mr. Ling was in hiding in the United States, the prosaic details of maintaining a California estate kept him tethered to Loomis: There were homeowners association fees to pay, and a gardener had to keep the bushes trimmed and the lawn mowed.

Mr. Matteson’s last contact with Mr. Ling was in May, when the alarm system in Mr. Ling’s house was activated and the security company asked Mr. Matteson to contact Mr. Ling to obtain the code to enter the gate to his home.

The Mattesons said they had never seen any unusual activity in the neighborhood, except for one visit several months ago by officers from the Department of Homeland Security, who said they were trying to contact Mr. Ling.

Ling Wancheng’s visa status is unclear. Christopher Bentley, a spokesman for the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, a division of Homeland Security, said that it usually took one to three years for an asylum case to be settled. During that period, he said, the asylum seeker is allowed to stay legally in the country.

Michael Forsythe reported from Loomis, and Mark Mazzetti from Washington.

Shhh… Hackers Target Database of Chinese with Ties to US Government

Check out the NYT article below.

Hackers May Have Obtained Names of Chinese With Ties to U.S. Government

By DAVID E. SANGER and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVISJUNE 10, 2015

WASHINGTON — Investigators say that the Chinese hackers who attacked the databases of the Office of Personnel Management may have obtained the names of Chinese relatives, friends and frequent associates of American diplomats and other government officials, information that Beijing could use for blackmail or retaliation.

Federal employees who handle national security information are required to list some or all of their foreign contacts, depending on the agency, to receive high-level clearances. Investigators say that the hackers obtained many of the lists, and they are trying to determine how many of those thousands of names were compromised.

In classified briefings to members of Congress in recent days, intelligence officials have described what appears to be a systematic Chinese effort to build databases that explain the inner workings of the United States government. The information includes friends and relatives, around the world, of diplomats, of White House officials and of officials from government agencies, like nuclear experts and trade negotiators.

“They are pumping this through their databases just as the N.S.A. pumps telephone data through their databases,” said James Lewis, a cyberexpert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “It gives the Chinese the ability to exploit who is listed as a foreign contact. And if you are a Chinese person who didn’t report your contacts or relationships with an American, you may have a problem.”

Officials have conceded in the briefings that most of the compromised data was not encrypted, though they have argued that the attacks were so sophisticated and well hidden that encryption might have done little good.

The first attack, which began at the end of 2013 and was disclosed in the middle of last year, was aimed at the databases used by investigators who conduct security reviews. The investigators worked for a contracting firm on behalf of the Office of Personnel Management, and the firm was fired in August.

The broader attack on the personnel office’s main databases followed in December. That attack, announced last week, involved the records of more than four million current and former federal employees, most of whom have no security clearances.

White House and personnel office officials have provided few details about the latest breach. But the Department of Homeland Security has been telling outside experts and members of Congress that it regards the detection of the attack as a success, because it made use of new “signatures” of foreign hackers, based on characteristics of computer code, to find the attack.

In a statement, the personnel office said Wednesday that “it was because of these new enhancements to our IT systems that O.P.M. was able to identify these intrusions.” But the detection happened in April, five months after the attack began.

The list of relatives and “close or continuous contacts” is a standard part of the forms and interviews required of American officials every five years for top-secret and other high-level clearances, and government officials consider the lists to be especially delicate.

In 2010, when The New York Times was preparing to publish articles based on 250,000 secret State Department cables obtained by WikiLeaks, the newspaper complied with a request by the department to redact the names of any Chinese citizens who were described in the cables as providing information to American Embassy officials. Officials cited fear of retaliation by the Chinese authorities.

Officials say they do not know how much of the compromised data was exposed to the Chinese hackers. While State Department employees, especially new ones, are required to list all their foreign friends, diplomats have so many foreign contacts that they are not expected to list them all.

But other government officials are frequently asked to do so, especially in interviews with investigators. The notes from those interviews, conducted by a spinoff of the personnel office called the United States Investigative Service, were obtained by hackers in the earlier episode last year.

Intelligence agencies use a different system, so the contacts of operatives like those in the C.I.A. were not in the databases.

But the standard form that anyone with a national security job fills out includes information about spouses, divorces and even distant foreign relatives, as well as the names of current or past foreign girlfriends and boyfriends, bankruptcies, debts and other financial information. And it appears that the hackers reached, and presumably downloaded, images of those forms.

“I can’t say whether this was more damaging than WikiLeaks; it’s different in nature,” said Representative Adam B. Schiff, a California Democrat who is a member of the House Intelligence Committee, which was briefed by intelligence officials, the Department of Homeland Security and the personnel office on Tuesday. Mr. Schiff, who declined to speak about the specifics of the briefing, added, “But it is certainly one of the most damaging losses I can think of.”

Investigators were surprised to find that the personnel office, which had already been so heavily criticized for lax security that its inspector general wanted parts of the system shut down, did not encrypt any of the most sensitive data.

The damage was not limited to information about China, though that presumably would have been of most interest to the hackers. They are likely to be particularly interested in the contacts of Energy Department officials who work on nuclear weapons or nuclear intelligence, Commerce Department or trade officials working on delicate issues like the negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and, of course, White House officials.

In a conference call with reporters on Wednesday, Senator Angus King, an independent from Maine on both the Intelligence Committee and the Armed Services Committee, called for the United States to retaliate for these kinds of losses. “Nation-states need to know that if they attack us this way, something bad is going to happen to their cyberinfrastructure,” he said.

But Mr. King said he could not say if the attacks on the personnel office were state-sponsored, adding, “I have to be careful; I can’t confirm the identity of the entity behind the attack.” The Obama administration has not formally named China, but there has been no effort to hide the attribution in the classified hearings.

The scope of the breach is remarkable, experts say, because the personnel office apparently learned little from earlier government data breaches like the WikiLeaks case and the surveillance revelations by Edward J. Snowden, both of which involved unencrypted data.

President Obama has said he regards the threat of cyberintrusions as a persistent challenge in a world in which both state and nonstate actors “are sending everything they’ve got at trying to breach these systems.”

The problem “is going to accelerate, and that means that we have to be as nimble, as aggressive and as well resourced as those who are trying to break into these systems,” he said at a news conference this week.

The White House has stopped short of blaming Katherine Archuleta, the director of the personnel office, for the breach, emphasizing that securing government computer systems is a challenging task.

Correction: June 10, 2015

An earlier version of a photo caption with this article misstated the name of the federal office building where employees handle national security information are required to list their foreign contacts. It is the Office of Personnel Management building, not Office of Personal Management.

Matt Apuzzo contributed reporting.

Shhh… Latest Cyberattacks on US Government a Hoax – To Restore NSA Surveillance?

You may have read and heard about the latest cyberattacks on the US government (see video above) over the weekend? Reckon you can’t help wondering how coincidental this “incident” was, judging by the following Guardian article. Nice strategy, Congress??

Shhh… China to Boost Cyber-Security with the World's First Quantum Communications Network – QC Satellite to Follow Next Year

Amid continuing Sino-US spats on cyber-espionage and related matters, China is beefing up its cyber and national security in a big way as it is reportedly just months away from launching the longest quantum communications network on earth stretching some 2,000 kilometer between its capital Beijing and financial center Shanghai to transfer data close to the speed of light with no hacking risks – initially to transmit sensitive diplomatic and classified information for the government and military with personal and financial data also on the cards for the near future.

And that’s ahead of the previously announced plan for 2016 to become the first country to launch a quantum communications satellite into the orbit.

Looks like Snowden was spot on again. In a post just a month ago, I wrote what he said about how the US (would and) is paying the price for focusing too much on the cyber offensive at the expense of cyber defense.

Meanwhile, following the recent cyber-attack on Sony Pictures, President Barack Obama’s homeland security and counter-terrorism adviser Lisa Monaco announced earlier this week a new intelligence unit – the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center – to take the lead in tracking cyber-threats by pooling and disseminating data on cyber-breaches to other US agencies.

“Currently, no single government entity is responsible for producing coordinated cyber threat assessments,” according to Monaco.


China nears launch of hack-proof ‘quantum communications’ link

Published: Feb 9, 2015 11:13 p.m. ET

Technology to be employed for military and other official uses

BEIJING (Caixin Online) — This may be a quantum-leap year for an initiative that accelerates data transfers close to the speed of light with no hacking threats through so-called “quantum communications” technology.

Within months, China plans to open the world’s longest quantum-communications network, a 2,000-kilometer (1,240-mile) electronic highway linking government offices in the cities of Beijing and Shanghai.

Meanwhile, the country’s aerospace scientists are preparing a communications satellite for a 2016 launch that would be a first step toward building a quantum communications network in the sky. It’s hoped this and other satellites can be used to overcome technical hurdles, such as distance restrictions, facing land-based systems.

Physicists around the world have spent years working on quantum-communications technology. But if all goes as planned, China would be the first country to put a quantum-communications satellite in orbit, said Wang Jianyu, deputy director of the China Academy of Science’s (CAS) Shanghai branch.

At a recent conference on quantum science in Shanghai, Wang said scientists from CAS and other institutions have completed major research and development tasks for launching the satellite equipped with quantum-communications gear.

The satellite program’s likelihood for success was confirmed by China’s leading quantum-communications scientist, Pan Jianwei, a CAS academic who is also a professor of quantum physics at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, in the eastern province of Anhui. Pan said researchers reported significant progress on systems development after conducting experiments at a test center in Qinghai province, in the northwest

The satellite would be used to transmit encoded data through a method called quantum key distribution (QKD), which relies on cryptographic keys transmitted via light-pulse signals. QKD is said to be nearly impossible to hack, since any attempted eavesdropping would change the quantum states and thus could be quickly detected by data-flow monitors.

A satellite-based quantum-communications system could be used to build a secure information bridge between the nation’s capital and Urumqi, a city that’s the capital of the restive Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in the west, Pan said.

It’s likely the technology initially will be used to transmit sensitive diplomatic, government-policy and military information. Future applications could include secure transmissions of personal and financial data.

Plans call for China to put additional satellites into orbit after next year’s ground-breaking launch, Pan said, without divulging how many satellites might be deployed or when. He did say that China hopes to complete a QKD system linking Asia and Europe by 2020, and have a worldwide quantum-communications network in place by 2030.

Success stories

In 2009, China became the first country in the world to put quantum-communications technology to work outside of a laboratory.

In October of that year, a team of scientists led by Pan built a secure network for exchanging information among government officials during a military parade in Beijing celebrating the 60th anniversary of the People’s Republic. The demonstration underscored the research project’s key military application.

“China is completely capable of making full use of quantum communications in a regional war,” Pan said. “The direction of development in the future calls for using relay satellites to realize quantum communications and control that covers the entire army.”

The country is also working to configure the new technology for civilian use.

A pilot quantum-communications network that took 18 months to build was completed in February 2012 in Hefei. The network, which cost the city’s government 60 million yuan ($9.6 million), was designed by Pan’s team to link 40 telephones and 16 video cameras installed at city government agencies, military units, financial institutions and health-care offices.

A similar, civilian-focused network built by Pan’s team in Jinan, the provincial capital of the eastern province of Shandong, started operating in March 2014. It connects some 90 users, most of whom tap the network for general business and information.

In late 2012, Pan’s team installed a quantum-communications network that was used to securely connect the Beijing venue hosting a week-long meeting of the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party, with hotel rooms where delegates stayed, as well as the Zhongnanhai compound in Beijing where the nation’s top leaders live and work.

Next on the development agenda is opening the network linking Beijing and Shanghai. Pan is leading that project as well.

If all goes as planned, Pan said, existing networks in Hefei and Jinan would eventually be tied to the Beijing-Shanghai channel to provide secure communications connecting government and financial agencies in each of the four regions. The new network could be operating as early as 2016.

No room for hype

A quantum code expert said that so far, quantum-communications technology development efforts in China have basically focused on protecting national security. “How important it will be for the public and in everyday life are questions that remain unanswered,” said the expert.

To date, Pan said, technical barriers and the high cost of systems development have kept private capital out of what’s now almost exclusively a government initiative. Moreover, it’s still too early to tell whether the technology has any potential commercial value.

Pan has warned the public not to listen to investment come-ons that hype the money-making potential of quantum-communications businesses. At this stage of the game, he said, the focus is still on technological development, not commercial applications.

Nevertheless, since 2009, USTC has been building a commercial enterprise called Anhui Quantum Communication Technology Co. to produce equipment based on technology developed by Pan and his team. The company is China’s largest quantum-communications equipment supplier. Last September, it said it had started mass-producing quantum-cryptography equipment.

Anhui Quantum general manager Zhao Yong said the company’s clients include financial institutions and government agencies seeking to supplement, not replace, conventional communications systems. Their shared goal, he said, is to improve data security.

Once the technology has matured, said Wang Xiangbin, a physicist at Beijing’s Tsinghua University, its range of applications should be targeted to specific industries and regions because of its high barrier in technology and cost. Quantum communications is not a technology suitable for mass use via the Internet, for example, Wang told a group of scientists at a 2012 seminar.

Some experts say it’s wrong to assume that quantum communications is a flawlessly secure means of transmitting information. Another Tsinghua physics professor, Long Guilu, said quantum communication is only theoretically safe, since malfunctioning equipment or operational errors can open doors to risk.

Experimental systems built in 2007 by Chinese and U.S. physicists reportedly achieved secure QKD transmissions between two points more than 100 kilometers apart. But the experiment also taught scientists that data can be intercepted by a third party during a transmission.

In addressing the naysayers, Pan admitted that quantum communications is not perfect. But he defended it as safer than conventional means of communication. In fact, he said, no means of protecting data is more secure than quantum communications.

To test the capacity and safety of the network linking Beijing and Shanghai, Pan said his team plans to ask other communications experts to carefully study the system and look for potential security holes. The network could then be modified in ways that close any detected gaps and reduce hacking risks.

“Assessments and testing will be conducted after the network is completed,” said Pan, who remains convinced that any network using quantum cryptographic technology is more secure than any other communications channel.

Pan has been working on quantum-communications technology since the late 1990s, when he was a researcher at the University of Vienna and working in a partnership with Austrian physicist Anton Zeilinger. That team is credited with developing the first protocol for quantum communications.

Pan worked with Zeilinger about a decade after U.S. physicist Charles Bennett and colleagues at IBM Research built the world’s first functioning quantum cryptographic system. Based on their research, the first network was installed in the U.S. city of Boston.

Like their counterparts in China, researchers in the United States, Japan and European countries continue work to advance the technology. A key effort is aimed at extending that potential reach of quantum-communications systems, which for years were used only to span short distances.

Some experts have even wondered whether the new technology has been misidentified, since its key feature is high-level cryptography, not electronic communications.

“What we can do now is merely encrypt data, which is far from real quantum communications,” said one expert who declined to be named. “Theoretically it can’t be hacked, but in practice it has many limitations.”

Guo Guangcan, director of USTC’s quantum-communications lab, said networks now operating and those being built in China “achieve encryption only,” whereas true communications networks “involve content.”

“It’s not accurate to call it quantum communications,” said Guo.

Whatever it’s called, China appears determined to push ahead with the research and development that paves the way for a new era of secure communications. And according to Pan, that era is still at least a decade away.

“It will take 10 to 20 years to really put (the technology) into practice,” said Pan.

Rewritten by Han Wei