Shhhcretly Exclusive: Edward Snowden’s Warning Cry

Shhhcretly is pleased to have the exclusive rights to release the English version of this coverage on Edward Snowden.

This original article was first published 1 December 2018 in German in the Austrian newspaper Der Standard, which reserves the publishing rights.

Shhhcretly would like to thank Der Standard and Steffen Arora for their kind permission to share the translated piece exclusively on this blog.

(Above) Photo credit: Lindsay Mills 2018.

 

Edward Snowden’s warning cry
By Steffen Arora
Der Standard, 1st December 2018

Former CIA contractor Edward Snowden’s revelations shone a light on the western world’s surveillance practices. But he, and those who helped him, are paying a high price. He talks to Der Standard about the need to fight on.

“This is retaliation.” In an interview with Der Standard, Edward Snowden spoke in no uncertain terms about the authorities’ treatment of the people who saved his life. In June 2013, the former US intelligence services contractor became a hounded whistleblower after he exposed the extent to which the US and its allies carry out global surveillance of the internet and digital communications, regardless of suspicious activity. He made these revelations from Hong Kong, never expecting that the moment they were published, he would become the world’s most wanted man.

It was the same moment that Robert Tibbo’s telephone rang. The Canadian had made a name for himself in the city as a dedicated human rights lawyer. He fought for the rights of asylum seekers living a pariah existence in Hong Kong – with next to no chance of their status being recognized and leading a decent life there. Tibbo saw Snowden as another refugee who needed help. To hide him from his pursuers, Tibbo found shelter for Snowden with some of his other clients; asylum seekers from Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

“They were warm, welcoming and kind. When I had fallen to the bottom of the world, they helped me up without giving a damn about who I was,” Snowden says. In the current political climate, loaded with the fear of outsiders, Snowden holds the refugees’ actions in even higher regard. “Their example, their humanity, it gave me a reason to keep fighting.”

Refugees and their lawyer under pressure

Not only Snowden, but also those who helped him, are now paying a high price for their actions. The US continues to accuse Snowden of spying and demand his extradition – and President Donald Trump would like to see him executed. Meanwhile, the seven refugees and their lawyer Mr. Tibbo are under pressure from the Hong Kong authorities.

In 2018, it is no longer an exception that human rights lawyers like Tibbo become the object of persecution themselves, says Manfred Nowak, Austrian human rights lawyer and former United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture. Not only lawyers, but also journalists and activists from NGOs are being increasingly targeted, he says, even murdered, as records such as Russia’s show. “Human rights have not been in a crisis like this since the end of the Second World War,” Nowak says.

For Snowden’s helpers, the situation has deteriorated to the extent that this week, Tibbo turned for help to a selection of media outlets including the New York Times, Paris Match and Der Standard. He himself was forced to leave Hong Kong under diplomatic protection. He had to leave the seven refugees behind.

Effectively in exile, he continues working for his clients, who are living in constant fear of deportation. No country wants to take them in. Even Canada, which showed willingness to do so back in 2016, appears to have retreated in the face of pressure from abroad.

“Death by delay” is how lawyers such as Pascal Paradis from the NGO Lawyers Without Borders, which has been working on the case, describes this process. Snowden himself, fleeing US authorities, was left stranded in Moscow. Since then he has faced accusations that he is a Russian spy.

In fact he was aiming for Latin America, he says. “The Department of State failed to cancel my passport in time to keep me from leaving Hong Kong. But once they realized I was in the air en route to Latin America, they made public announcements to put every government around the world on notice that they intended to block my freedom of movement.”

No asylum in Austria

When he landed in Moscow for a stopover, he was stuck and could not travel further. All of his asylum applications in Europe were rejected, including by Austria. “This more than anything else is what prevents me from leaving Russia,” Snowden says in response to his critics. “If major powers of Europe can be induced by this or that secret promise to be violators of the asylum right rather than its guarantor, you can’t help but question the whole system. If you can’t count on a right now, can you count on a law?”

Manfred Nowak also sees this danger. “Democracy as a form of government is increasingly coming under pressure, as we can see in the US, Great Britain, Hungary, Poland or Italy. These countries are governed by populists, who came to power through democratic channels, but are now attacking democracy.” Nowak sees Brazil’s new president, Jair Bolsonaro, as a particularly stark example of a fascist being voted in to lead a democracy.

Nowak stresses the importance of learning from history: Free elections have destroyed democracies time and time again. “Strident democracies” urgently need to defend themselves against “pseudo- democracies,” he says, pointing to leaders such as Trump, Viktor Orban and Bolsonaro.

The western world is currently experiencing a backlash, meaning human rights defenders must go on the offensive, Nowak says. “Everyone must do their bit,” he warns emphatically. “Otherwise it could be too late.”

Nowak sees this backlash in Austria too, where the center-right and far-right are governing in coalition. “Measures are being taken which are being seen, and therefore criticized, as restrictions on the constitutional state, democracy and human rights.”

“There’s a machine behind it”

Snowden sees the refugees’ treatment and his own as telling. “You can’t look at something like this without getting a sense that the mask has dropped, and behind all the pretense of civility and process we like to believe governs our little day to day, there’s a machine behind it that would burn everything we love to the ground without a tear if it meant making a problem go away.”

Snowden is convinced it’s no coincidence that those who helped him are now being targeted. “They’re worried about the example of these families, the symbol their moral choice represents. Anybody can look at this situation and see at a glance who is right and who is wrong.”

But if the “big governments” manage to rewrite this story with an unhappy ending for those involved, they will also succeed in changing the positive message of his work with a single blow, Snowden warns. He says he does not know how far state institutions would go to achieve this, “but they’ve already gone too far.”

Human rights lawyer Nowak has first-hand experience of the conditions in Hong Kong, where the seven migrants are currently stuck. He trained lawyers there; Tibbo was one of his students.

Nowak says he knew the Hong Kong Bar Association, which is putting the Canadian lawyer under pressure and sabotaging his mandate for the refugees, as an “independent institution.” He can only assume the bar’s current treatment of Tibbo is a result of “enormous pressure from outside.”

Snowden has called on his supporters not to give up on the fight for a free world. And above all the fight for those who helped him. “Take a look at the world. Before long, we’ll all feel like refugees.”

NOTE: Documents evidencing the Hong Kong Bar Association egregious treatment of Mr Tibbo can be found in the Der Standard article as embedded PDFs: https://www.derstandard.at/story/2000092725390/pressure-mounts-on-edward-snowdens-lawyer-robert-tibbo?ref=article

Shhh… Updates on Edward Snowden & the Snowden Refugees

I am proud to share with you a presentation by my fellow alumnus Robert Tibbo, best known as the lawyer for American whistleblower Edward Snowden, on 29 December 2019 in Messe Leipzig, Germany, an update on the situation with Snowden and the Snowden Refugees.

The lecture covers the current global erosion and dismantling of international refugees and constitutional law by increasingly authoritarian democracies and loss of international protection for whistleblowers and the brave people who protect whistleblowers, like the Snowden Refugees.

“The Snowden Refugees still in limbo in Hong Kong are at heightened risk and need public support and donations to survive. The two children in Hong Kong need to be brought to the safety of Canada at the earliest time to remove them from the dangers in Hong Kong and to have all three children reunited in Montreal,” said Tibbo.

Snowden will make an appearance in the 35th minute of the lecture.

“The choices that we made, and the things that you do, they have power. And doing nothing, that’s a choice. Now lots of us would like to think that’s a willing choice. We like to think that we are the sole captain of our own destiny. And that’s the way it’s supposed to be, that’s the way it’s intended, that’s the way we designed the system,” according to Snowden.

“And yet the system today, somehow the actors within it spend an enormous amount of energy trying to make you forget that the things you do affect the outcomes. They’ll tell you not to worry about it, that it’s not so bad. After all it ‘could be worse’. But I say to you it could be better.

“And every time we hear those words, that’s what we need to say – Every system in history, even the most powerful, has been subject to change. And every hack that is performed against us can face a patch.”

Shhh… French Asylum Offer to Snowden & Assange as Ultimate US Contempt

(Above) Photo credit: The Intercept

No surprise, that’s the ultimate official French reaction to the WikiLeaks’ Espionnage Élysée exposé on the NSA “unspeakable practice” earlier this week – check out The Intercept article below.

French Justice Minister Says Snowden and Assange Could Be Offered Asylum

By Jenna McLaughlin @JennaMC_Laugh

French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira thinks National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange might be allowed to settle in France.

If France decides to offer them asylum, she would “absolutely not be surprised,” she told French news channel BFMTV on Thursday (translated from the French). She said it would be a “symbolic gesture.”

Taubira was asked about the NSA’s sweeping surveillance of three French presidents, disclosed by WikiLeaks this week, and called it an “unspeakable practice.”

Her comments echoed those in an editorial in France’s leftist newspaper Libération Thursday morning, which said giving Snowden asylum would be a “single gesture” that would send “a clear and useful message to Washington,” in response to the “contempt” the U.S. showed by spying on France’s president.

Snowden, who faces criminal espionage charges in the U.S., has found himself stranded in Moscow with temporary asylum as he awaits responses from two dozen countries where he’d like to live; and Assange is trapped inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to avoid extradition to Sweden. (See correction below.)

Taubira, the chief of France’s Ministry of Justice, holds the equivalent position of the attorney general in the United States. She has been described in the press as a “maverick,” targeting issues such as poverty and same-sex marriage, often inspiring anger among French right-wingers.

Taubira doesn’t actually have the power to offer asylum herself, however. She said in the interview that such a decision would be up to the French president, prime minister and foreign minister. And Taubira just last week threatened to quit her job unless French President François Hollande implemented her juvenile justice reforms.

Correction: Due to an editing error, an earlier version of this article improperly described the state of Assange’s case in Sweden and his reason for avoiding extradition. He has refused to go to Sweden, where he faces accusations of sexual assault, because he fears he could then be extradited to the United States.

(This post is from our blog: Unofficial Sources.)

Shhh… Norway to Arrest Nobel-nominated Snowden

The Norwegian police should arrest NSA whistle-blower and fugitive Edward Snowden if he showed up in Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Prize this December, according to a Norwegian politician.

Norwegian Right Wing Party MP Michael Tatzschner warned that bagging the prestigious prize would in no way exempt Snowden from arrest and Norway should not make a distinction between a Nobel Peace Prize winner and any other wanted American citizen.

“Norway needs to respect the agreements that we have signed,” Tatzschener told Norway’s media Dagbladet on Tuesday, with reference to international law that, given a valid US warrant, requires Norway to arrest Snowden if he arrives in the country.

MAD-Magazine-Snowden-Flee

Snowden (shown above: Photo credit to MAD magazine) has been nominated for the Peace Prize, to be announced end of the year, amid growing global support.

He was recently granted a three-year residence permit by the Russian authorities on August 1.

But the most wanted man in the world could receive Swiss asylum if he opts to travel to Switzerland to testify against the National Security Agency, according to my previous piece earlier this week.

The Swiss Attorney General has stated that Switzerland would not extradite a US citizen if the individual’s “actions constitute a political offense, or if the request has been politically motivated”.

Shhh… was Snowden Tricked?

Today is one year to the day Edward Snowden revealed himself to the world from a hotel in Hong Kong as the source of the NSA leaks.

How timely, there’s a report in the Daily Mail that former KGB agent Boris Karpichkov said the Russian spies agencies (now known as the Federal Security Service (FSB) and Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR))have identified Snowden as a potential defector “as far back as 2007” and the Russian spies have ‘tricked’ him into asking Moscow for asylum by posing as diplomats.

“It was a trick and he fell for it. Now the Russians are extracting all the intelligence he possesses,” according to Karpichkov.

Would you believe it?

For Whom the Whistle Blows

That Whistle Could Have You Behind Bars

For Whom the Bell Tolls was a 1940 novel by Ernest Hemingway about an American in the International Brigades who blows up a bridge during the Spanish Civil War with death the ultimate sacrifice.

But what about For Whom The Whistle Blows? That informs the current debate about Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, two Americans who risked their lives by leaking documents on US foreign policy and covert cyber-snooping activities during the US war on terrorism. Are they prisoners – one in a US army stockade and the other in exile in Moscow – of conscience?

In contrast to the contemptuous labels and espionage charges the US government slapped on the two, one a US Army private first class and the other a former government intelligence contractor, both claimed their motive was to spark public debate and promote greater transparency in US government conduct. Whistle-blowers in general have all along been quite rightly championed and heralded by the authorities, media and the general public – at least by those whose oxen are not being gored from the revelations. Such are the dichotomies of modern history.

You can find the entire column here and there.